Techniques

Joint Manipulation

Joint manipulation is a hands-on technique we use very fequently at The Back and Body Clinic to help release a stiff spinal or peripheral joint. It is important that this kind of technique is only used by highly trained and expert therapists. It involves a specifically directed manual thrust, which is often accompanied by an audible ‘pop’ or ‘crack’. Joint manipulation aims to restore full range of pain-free movement. Our therapists will use this technique hand in hand with other effective soft tissue and joint techniques and we get great results – as well as combining this with right home exercises and self help technqies to maximise the benefits of any hands on treatment like this.

Effects of Manipulation

Spinal manipulations can relieve back pain by taking pressure off sensitive nerves or tissue, restoring blood flow, reducing muscle tension, and promoting the release of chemicals like endorphins and serotonin within the body to act as natural painkillers.

Effects of Mobilisation

The pain killing effects of mobilisation and SMTT have been to a large degree amalgamated in the literature. Spinal mobilisation can relieve back pain by taking pressure off sensitive nerves or tissue, restoring blood flow, reducing muscle tension, and promote the release of chemicals like endorphins and serotonin within the body to act as natural painkillers.

Spinal mobilisation aims to restore full range of motion to the joint by activating mechanoreceptors within the capsule of the joints. It also has the effect of altering the neuromuscular (nerve) firing within muscles to cause a reflex relaxation of the surrounding tight musculature. Simply, it helps to restore normal pain free motion. Although primarily used in the treatment of joint conditions, mobilisations can also be extremely effective when dealing with nerve or muscular injuries.

Joint Mobilsation

Joint mobilisation is a passive hands-on movement technique applied to a stiff spinal or peripheral joint. Mobilisation is particularly effective when combined with other treatments such as soft tissue and muscle stabilising techniques, along with exercise. A thorough physical examination by your physiotherapist will determine if mobilisation is the most appropriate technique for your particular presentation.
Mobilisation involves rhythmic oscillations within a normal range of joint-motion or against a restrictive barrier (Maitland et al. 2001) and is associated with slower loading rates than manipulation (Maitland et al. 2001). Mobilisation is generally performed at less than 2Hz and with a larger number of loading-cycles (Evans and Breen 2006).

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