Fracture

Scaphoid fracture diagramA fracture occurs when enough force is applied to a bone to break it. When this happens, there is pain, swelling, and decreased use of the injured part. Many people think that a fracture is different from a break, but they are the same. Fractures may be simple with the bone pieces aligned and stable. Other fractures are unstable and the bone fragments tend to displace or shift.

Fractures often take place in the hand. Some fractures will cause an obvious deformity, such as a crooked finger, but many fractures do not. The most commonly broken bone of the wrist is the radius, followed by fracture of the scaphoid bone. Both occur most frequently from a fall onto the outstretched hand. Because of the close relationship of bones to ligaments and tendons, the hand may be stiff and weak after the fracture heals. Fractures that involve joint surfaces may lead to early arthritis in those involved joints. This is why physiotherapy following a fracture is key.

Treatment for Post Fractures
Physiotherapy treatment for patients with this condition is vital to hasten the healing process, ensure an optimal outcome and decrease the likelihood of injury recurrence. Treatment may comprise: